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FAQ: Legal Dualism and Bilingual Bisystemism - Principles and Applications
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The LDPC guide contains information sections including:

  • The Preface
  • The Legal Acronyms and Abbreviations
  • The Elements of an Article
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Publications &
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  • Documentary sources for supplements
  • Reports and analyses
  • Articles and presentations
  • Publicity / Advertisement

Coming soon...

Supplements that will be published online include:

  • an index of translational equivalents (ex: bien / property, propriété / property);
  • a second series of etymological analyses;
  • a second part for the supplement on the interpretive dilemma within private law in federal judicial texts.
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Legal Dictionary of Property in Canada (LDPC)

The bisystemic and bilingual Legal Dictionary of Property in Canada offers over 300 articles describing the vocabulary of property relative to Canada's civil and common law systems. [more...]

The authors: Anne Des Ormeaux and Jean-Marie Lessard

The LDPC Corpus

The LDPC corpus is available online for consultation. This textual database includes all the decisions from which excerpts were drawn and cited in the Legal Dictionary of Property in Canada. The time period of these decisions ranges from 1842 to 2008. However, it is important to note that over 40% were rendered between 2000 and 2008 and less than 10% were rendered prior to 1980.

Legal Dualism and Bilingual Bisystemism - Principles and Applications

With these few answers to the most frequently-asked questions concerning bilingual bisystemism and legal dualism, the authors of the Legal Dictionary of Property in Canada (LDPC) hope to clarify certain basic concepts relating both to the bisystemic and bilingual lexicographical design of the work, and to the dualist foundation of the legal theory on which it is based.

Have a look at the new "Frequently Asked Questions" (FAQ) page.

Interpretive Dilemma of Private Law in Federal Law within Judicial Texts and Legal Dualism: First Part

The coexistence of civil law and common law systems in Canadian private law adds to the complexity of the constitutional division of legislative powers and gives rise to an interpretive dilemma generally referred to in federal law as complementarity-dissociation. This dilemma consists of determining, on a case-by-case basis, the need to refer to the private law of the province where the dispute arises to complement applicable federal law. To assess the state of interpretive practice in Canadian courts in this area, the Legal Dualism Team has catalogued nearly 200 relevent court decisions.

We encourage you to browse this corpus using one of the various indexes available. An introductory text describing our approach is also available.

In the news...
Events / Activities in 2014

May 26 and 27, 2014

A series of workshops were presented by the authors of the LDPC and its online supplements, to students of the Masters program in transnational law offered by the Faculty of Law at l'Université de Sherbrooke.

March 31, 2014

Presentation given by the authors of the LDPC ands its online supplements, within the framework of the Masters course entitled: Séminaire d'analyse des problématiques juridiques offered by the Faculty of Law at l'Université de Sherbrooke.

March 11, 2014

Presentation given by the authors of the LDPC ands its online supplements, within the framework of the National Program offered by the Faculty of Law at the University of Ottawa.

Events / Activities in 2013

December 10, 2013

Have a look at the new "Frequently Asked Questions" (FAQ) page.

October 4, 2013

Interpretive Dilemma of Private Law: First Part -- we encourage you to browse the corpus of court decisions that address the interpretive dilemma of private law, in federal law. This dilemma consists of determining, on a case-by-case basis, the need to refer to the private law of the province where the dispute arises to complement applicable federal law. This corpus of approximately 200 decisions can be consulted using one of the various indexes available.

January 11, 2013

Etymological Studies: First Series -- At 21 studies, these first analyses are exclusively published online and describe the etymology of words with meanings that are commonly used in Canadian property law. The translational equivalent patrimoine / patrimony, for example, was analyzed as an LDPC entry.

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